Let us not turn ourselves into robots: the rewarding artistic endevours

While we all love spring with its first greens and blooms, there is nothing as romantic as the fall for those who love contemplating, meditating and plunging into colors and foggy sceneries. Oh well, days are getting shorter and cool breeze reminds us that the fall is almost at our doorstep.

It is a busy season for me, as well. Not only because workshops are well attended when the weather quite often turns from sunny to rainy, but also because it is time to sort out everything what has been done so far and finalize the schedules for fall/winter classes, exhibitions and events.

There is something very special about people indulging in arts and creativity. Most of them know that our life is too short to achieve everything we dreamt about, yet, we are still trying to climb up mountains of imagination in order to reach some foggy tops, we are still trying to explain the magic and make it our closest companion. Some will succeed, but all of them will have amazing moments filled with feelings of discovery, filled with the sense we have understood something that few others will.

I had a chance to test whether art classes could potentially cure teens from computer addiction and dependence from mobile devices. Parents were very skeptical at the beginning because these were kids who would not leave their computer to have dinner. It still was worth a try. Unfortunately the time frame was too short, however, they not only were drawing and painting in watercolor with great enthusiasm, but they asked for more classes and more opportunities to use pencil, paints and paper. I had to leave, but they actually had acquired some skill which they were using on their own after I was not giving any more classes. That is a remarkable achievement, and that also makes me want to introduce more people to art which can be created from scratch without any use of photos, computers, edited images or printouts. This exercises our memory, brain flexibility, decision-making and focusing ability, attention, fine motor movements, takes care of confidence and brings more satisfaction into somebody’s sometimes boring and very predictable life. We cannot spend the entire life in a company of phones, computers and tablets. There has to be something to level this out and return us to a balanced state. Sports and dancing and is not for everybody, especially if they have some health issues, so I can see the huge potential in artistic endeavours.

Every person who has put down the glass of drink in order to pick up the paint brush is an achievement. Every person who has found a new content and purpose in their well-being because of doing art is a gain for society. Every kid who is growing up surrounded by harmony of colors and shapes, but not by images of horror movies, is worth a try. Finally, every person who is a bit happier today than they were yesterday is worth the effort. I am not saying this to give somebody false expectations of positive outcomes or just for the sake of nice content. I have seen this happening: talents unfolding, people becoming more humane and more interested in their lives, health issues getting less bothersome and kids experiencing more childhood, not more of computer games. I will keep spreading the word of the extremely great impact of arts on our human existence, and I would be happy, you do, too.

The attached images were done during intensive watercolor workshops for teens. I was in a big rush, teens works will follow because there were just very many.

Fall vegetables: watercolor sketches

Quick demos and sketches of vegetables and leaves

Late summer leaves

Grape leaves: pen and watercolor

Tomatoes: watercolor and pen sketch

Tomatoes: in the garden and on the table

Fall leaves: watercolor sketch

More leaves and vegetables

Green peas: watercolor and pen sketch

Green peas

Fall leaves and vegetables: watercolor and pen sketch

View at my demo pieces

Fall colors in leaves and tomatoes: watercolor

 

Fall colors in leaves and tomatoes: watercolor and pen sketches

0 Replies to “Let us not turn ourselves into robots: the rewarding artistic endevours”

  1. Fascinating. As a former public school teacher, I know that electronic devices have to be surgically removed from teens. If you can do it with art, even once in a while, then I am truly impressed by the power of your art teaching!

    1. I completely agree. Parents simply were convinced they would not even touch the brush or pencil. They actually did draw and paint with great pleasure, and, honestly, it was not fair, but I had to leave and come back to Canada, so these kids got interruption. However, they were drawing on their own in a small group, I was told later. I think, we have to replace the action which is desperately missing in addicted students with something that takes mind off to such an extent that the craving is forgotten. Art can do that. Also for deeply grieving people and for those with mental disorders, which have not deteriorated to the clinical grade yet.

  2. What a great idea! People spend too much time on computers and watching TV and art is one of the best ways to forget about the electronic devices and just enjoy the painting or drawing. I think you simply forget about the world around you :), Lovely post!

    1. Thanks! That’s true! We need to have something for balance. Everything is digital and electronics are used for every step, but simple activities like drawing or art making keeps us intact and allows seeing nature’s adventures and the world around us slightly differently and with more insight.

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