Value of creativity and creative fall paintings

Creativity is a very valuable feature. Creativity can save us in bad times and help blossom in good times. I have noticed that people either are creative, or they believe they do not need creativity. These who can buy everything ready-made, do not usually bother too much with being creative.

Creativity is frequently inherited: no child should grow up being only as creative as the computer or cell phone screen allows. The genuine creativity does not need much; it often uses just a small idea, a guess that we could make something out of nothing. By repurposing and recycling old things, we create a new life for them. That is a very interesting process on its own, and these old things become so adorable by adding just an artistically creative touch.

Creative brain is actually flexible, resourceful and very active brain. It tries to explore every potential, possibility and probability. It skips the surface and looks deeper: what if something useful is hiding there?

Most people are not born with a need for creativity or being addicted to a creative self-expression. It is possible to live long and happy life without ever having an idea what that is.

I do not like the pre-printed greeting cards because they take away from me the creative freedom: there is no space for my own poem or words I want to say to that particular person. I prefer to create my own greeting cards.

I have noticed a huge decline in human cognitive function just over the past 7 years. The decision making ability has decreased abnormally.

While most people can type, how many can still do hand-drawing or hand-writing? I hear you: who needs the handwriting or drawing when one can get everything done much faster using the touch screen? Well, our brain does. Nobody has cancelled the fine motor skills, and the more one excels at drawing from life, the more active brain they will have for a long time.

Art is definitely totally underappreciated as a recovery tool from cognitive slow-downs. The benefits from doing art and being creative are many.

Most people believe that perfecting drawing or painting skills is necessary only for artists, however, the regular artistic activities are the best brain booster ever, just to mention journaling, sketching, sketchbook keeping, writing and illustrating diaries, creating decorations or gifts.

One should not put it off until the moment when sharp decline in cognitive function is observed. Daily practicing is certainly the best: the more exercise we give the brain, the better our eye-hand coordination, memory and visual perception becomes.

Art classes do not require being an artist, but these who just picked up the pencil or brush should be also aware that art does not happen in 1 hour. Never. Painting a wall takes some skill, but painting images on that wall will certainly take a lot more skill.

Creativity can be developed and boosted, but the main thing is the willingness to be creative. That means thinking creatively, making unexpected decisions, finding answers to new questions and practising a lot.

I am very patient. I can works for years on a painting until I take it there where I want it to be.

The cheapening of art and the fact that everything is called art is really hurting me and artists who take art seriously. If I paint for 3 weeks every single day, I am not willing to sell such painting for 50 bucks. I am not. I also sometimes like some painting so much that I cannot detach myself from it. That passes over time, but there is huge attraction sometimes.

There are certainly people who produce art: use one template, the same set of colors and tools and just make out more and more of the same. That is art production.

We worked on sponge and acrylic project last week. I personally use sponge with acrylic paint a lot because that allows implementing under-painting or first layers much faster, thus, giving more time for top layers.

To learn using sponge with acrylic paints, you can apply for live art classes if you are in Durham region, Ontario: https://inesepogagallery.com/classes-workshops-schedule/

Retouched grey fall barns

Prints

Fall paintings grey barns
The grey fall barns creative fall paintings

The afternoon birch forest

Prints and art products with prints

Value of creativity, creative fall paintings, birch forest
Afternoon birch forest, creative painting

The birch forest path

Prints and art products with prints

Value of creativity, birch forest path painting
Birch forest path

Enjoy!

 

Try something different: painting with sponge

I decided that adding some new technique wouldn’t disturb. Why not to give it a try?

This time it was application of watercolor using a sea grass sponge. It worked well with acrylic (I will post these pictures separately), it seemed it could work nicely with watercolor, as well.

I could see after the first attempts that it is advisable to test colors first. There are lots of brands, many types of paints, it’s hard to know whether the chosen colors will or won’t mix well. The big fear was not to overdo right at the beginning. Sponging sort of takes away easily, and it takes no time to lose focus and to forget where exactly was I intending to place any particular paint. I did not plan for these paintings, I just got straight to sponging. I would advise anybody who is trying this technique to plan a small bit ahead. Sponge allows to create beautiful watercolor backgrounds, like distant trees or forests, it is amazing how quickly some spots get textures, and it is a fantastic for layering watercolor paints. Simply don’t forget to test your colors.

It seemed that Hooker’s green light and dark in combination with French ultramarine, Cobalt blue, Payne’s grey, Lemon yellow and Burnt sienna or Burnt umber worked better than Sap green in any combination unless I mixed only 2 or 3 colors in all layers.

Sea grass sponges are inexpensive and available at any art store, that’s at least where I got them. Every sponge is slightly different, so will be textures created using these sponges. I cut my sponge in smaller parts, and used every time that part which seemed to be the most fitting. Sponge has to be made wet at first, and we should squeeze out all excess water before picking up the paint with it.

Sponging works on wet paper (wet in wet application), and we can paint nice distant backgrounds this way. It creates thicker layers and attractive irregular shapes when applied on dry paper. It is possible to create the entire painting this way, and it looks especially great when we combine different techniques.

Generally speaking, application of a sponge helps loosen up, and sponge is a good tool to vary paint application techniques.

These paintings look somehow better not photographed. The light hasn’t been too suitable recently, but regardless of how hard I tried, I did not get the balance on photos which is present on paper. This might be due to the distinctive number of layers at each part since camera sees everything not in the same way as the human eye sees. These things were tough to photograph, it was almost as bad as taking pictures of pastel drawings.

 

First layers of watercolor using a sea grass sponge

Different colors and textures: watercolor forest painting with sponge

Layering quite a few colors with sponge is interesting: we never know how it will look at the end!

Spring forest painting: watercolor

Simple sponge painting exercise

The distant forest is painted using sponge: the darks in the background look much darker than on paper, like I said before, camera picks out some spots and reflects colors differently from the human eye.

Sponge painting with watercolor

Sponge applied for background and some spots in the front

sponge work and winter csene 012

Spring forest: watercolor painting using sponge